Saturday, March 15, 2014

One Year.

I can not believe it. This time last year I was waddling around “nesting” and getting ready for the big day. This year I’m running around getting ready for her first birthday.

It’s been a journey to say the least. Not just the Cleft, but normal baby milestones and regular every day living.

My most frightening/rewarding/challenges of the last 12 months:
1) Gave birth to a beautiful girl and now having a new life to care for.
2) I left the security of a 40 hour steady job to a real careers in a field I’m good at that also brings me joy.
3) Watched two of my best friends say “I do” at their wedding and then grow in love and life together.
4) Co-Produced 4 short films, one music video and was in several more + we screened our feature film for our investors.
5) Traveled to the American Film Market and learned a LOT about business.
6) Held my little girls hand through 2 major surgeries and all the medical treatment in between.

It’s strange, because I can’t really imagine a time without her. I know there was a long period of my life that was baby free. And I have those fond memories of shenanigans. But honestly, it feels like she was always there.

And now that I can hold her, she’s given me such profound direction. Not that I wasn’t clear about my path before, but by stripping distractions and focusing on what’s important I’ve been able to direct my goals and grab the reigns of my own life more than I ever have before.

So yeah. One year. I no longer measure it by the first of January and the end of December. Time is now measured in moments with Ondine, and I like that time frame.

Monday, March 10, 2014

Actors Beware

To say I've been in this business a while is a long stretch.  I was 6 months old in my first film. The little one in pink, that's me in the opening sequence for "Mass Appeal" staring Jack Lemmon. Now, as an adult I write, produce and one a good week I get to act too. So I've been doing this some time.

I preface this with that because I don't want to give the impression that this post is by some poor no-expereince soul who was swindled by a scam artist. Oh no. I've been around a while and I've seen this dog and pony show before.

Recently I was contacted by a local management company. They had messaged me on my profile through which by some miracle I saw (I'm never on the damn thing).  So I set up an audition with them, prepared my monologue/headshot/resume and made a trip to their office. Remember it's important to note that they invited me to audition for them.

It was a terrible audition. The monologue was fine, not as funny as the film it's from but neither is the scene. But the commercial audition... Oh my lanta! It was not for a real product, it was a generic one off of their website they asked me to memorize. It was poorly written but my performance was no excuse. I gave a BAD audition. And much to my surprise the Manager asked me to sit, and discuss my future.

She asked what I noticed most about them. The first was that they were a faith based company if their logo and the cross by the door were an indication. The second was that they had a fair amount of resources for prospective talent on their website- even if they didn't list a single talent person but a lot of "clients" they've worked with.

She told me a I needed new head shots (which was true) and that in three weeks there was a New Faces mandatory meeting before they signed anyone. Ok, I'd never heard that one before but the industry is evolving so quickly right now a sort of staff meeting seems like a good way to establish expectations between new talent and the management company.

My red flags flared when they suggested one, and only one, photographer. I went to the photographers website and it was "under construction." That's all well in good, but it's still under construction. It's been that way for weeks and I can't find this photographer anywhere else.  Hmmm.

I'd like to use my own photographer please.

We don't like Seattle photographers. They don't understand LA style.

Well, here's a link to her work, I would really like to at least consider her.

We don't like Seattle photographers.
At this point I insist on using my photographer. Mostly because if they refuse it's a complete red flag, see you later thanks for you time situation. I mean Agents and Mangers can and will suggest photographers they trust but they by no means should insist on one, and only one. The second because I want to give paid work to a local I trust over an out of towner whose website is down.

I checked in with some of the casting directors I have a personal relationship with about LA style, photographers and their thoughts. Yes there is an LA style. And  a NY style. And an "everywhere else" style. A good photographer will know that. No your manage/agent should never insist on only one but rather make suggestions and work with you on decisions.

Suffice it to say that I worked with my photographer. But once they saw the proofs, they couldn't find anything nice to say. Mind you, I'm not yet signed. My resume is full of current work and expected work shooting over the summer and I had just fulfilled the one thing they had requested: Get new head shots. I'm confirmed for the mandatory meeting and ready to hear their pitch on why they are the company I should work with.

Then I get an email. It talks about trust, and relationships. How they don't feel a need to do things on my terms. Basically it was an it's our way or the highway letter.

After a lifetime of film work both in front of and behind the camera I have learned a thing or two. Most importantly when to walk away. I politely thanked them for their time, and walked away.